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Early Infant Oral Care

Perinatal & Infant Oral Health

Talk to your doctor or dentist about ways you can prevent periodontal disease during pregnancy.

 

Additionally, mothers with poor oral health may be at a greater risk of passing the bacteria which causes cavities to their young children. Mother’s should follow these simple steps to decrease the risk of spreading cavity-causing bacteria:

 

Visit your dentist regularly.
Brush and floss on a daily basis to reduce bacterial plaque.
Proper diet, with the reduction of beverages and foods high in sugar & starch.

Use a fluoridated toothpaste recommended by the ADA and rinse every night with an alocohol-free, over-the-counter mouth rinse with .05 % sodium fluoride in order to reduce plaque levels.

Don’t share utensils, cups or food which can cause the transmission of cavity-causing bacteria to your children.
Use of xylitol chewing gum (4 pieces per day by the mother) can decrease a child’s caries rate.

When Will My Baby Start Getting Teeth?
Teething, the process of baby (primary) teeth coming through the gums into the mouth, is variable among individual babies. Some babies get their teeth early and some get them late. In general, the first baby teeth to appear are usually the lower front (anterior) teeth and they usually begin erupting between the age of 6-8 months. See “Eruption of Your Child’s Teeth” for more details.

 

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay (Early Childhood Caries)
One serious form of decay among young children is baby bottle tooth decay, also referred to by dentists as early childhood caries. This condition is caused by frequent and long exposures of an infant’s teeth to liquids that contain sugar. Among these liquids are milk (including breast milk), formula, fruit juice and other sweetened drinks.

 

Putting a baby to bed for a nap or at night with a bottle other than water can cause serious and rapid tooth decay. Sweet liquid pools around the child’s teeth giving plaque bacteria an opportunity to produce acids that attack tooth enamel. If you must give the baby a bottle as a comforter at bedtime, it should contain only water.  If your child won’t fall asleep without the bottle and its usual beverage, gradually dilute the bottle’s contents with water over a period of two to three weeks.
After each feeding, wipe the baby’s gums and teeth with a damp washcloth or gauze pad to remove plaque. The easiest way to do this is to sit down, place the child’s head in your lap or lay the child on a dressing table or the floor. Whatever position you use, be sure you can see into the child’s mouth easily.


Offers not valid with third party remuneration.
Drs Thomas Youngblood, Ashley Burns, General Dentists
Dr Weston Jones, Pediatric Dentist

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